Stone Sentinels, battlefield monuments of the American Civil War

Winchester - Rutherford's Farm

The Great Indian (and Wagon) Road

The The Great Indian (and Wagon) Road marker was erected in 2008 by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources.

 

How to get there

The marker is northeast of Winchester, Virginia on Martinsburg Pike (U.S. 11, about 0.3 mile east of the Interstate 81 exit. There is a parkng area for the markers on the north side of Martinsburg Pike just to the east of the shopping center parking area. (39.219433° N, 78.1333° W ; see map)

 

From the marker:

 

Q4

The Great Indian (and Wagon) Road

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The Great Indian Road, called Philadelphia Wagon Road by many settlers, was developed by Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) warriors traveling in the 1700s through the Great Valley of the Appalachians (which they called Jonontore) from Cohongaronto (north of the Potomac), to raid the Catawba in the Carolinas. In 1743, Iroquois headmen complained that Europeans had settled along the road, a treaty violation. The Lancaster Treaty of 1744 clarified the road’s direction and acknowledged the Iroquois’ right to travel through Frederick County to New River settlements and farther south. This road later brought immigrants to the Valley in Conestoga wagons. Today U.S. Route 11 generally follows the historic road.

 



Marker to the Great Indian (and Wagon) Road northeast of Winchester, Virginia.
(above) Marker to the Great Indian (and Wagon) Road northeast of Winchester, Virginia.

 


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